DS26

Pro (Save) Prentice!

Posted in opinion, other architects, projects, responsibility, sustainability by DS26 on 04.28.2011

In the recent weeks I came across the very controversial issue of the Prentice, a Goldberg-designed concrete structure, originally a women’s hospital in downtown Chicago.

I am a mid-century and concrete lover… all things cast-in-place, or raw exposed concrete, are my thing and I am with those in effort to save it.

Northwestern University, currently (and seemingly stubborn about it) are looking to demolish the place to build a new tower. A research facility. If you asked me that seems… counter-productive.

Demolition Costs + Expenditure in New Construction ≠ Gain

Plus, there is significant architectural value that is inherit of Prentice, and it adds to the significant architectural value of the city of Chicago.

As a (soon to be) builder – and aside from my design self (architecture licensing in progress) – what really hurts in this case is the disregard for the methods used in the creation of this project.

Why, you ask?… well, it is cost-prohibitive.

Meaning that the costs that are incurred in an all concrete structure or cast-in-place project, the labor costs, and its curvilinear form (which comes with formwork costs), all come together to insurmountable amounts in today’s market… not to mention the lack of craftsmanship that comes with today’s workforce.

Oh, and let me guess?

Northwestern wants a LEED certified building?… Am I right?…(yes! Probably.)

Have you not heard? :

The most sustainable building, is the building already built!!

I was reading and looking through the reuse plans that have been published, and all seem very adequate, achievable, and effective for their purpose. I especially liked the residential study (and can imagine that firm that actually came up with it – trying to add interior curvilinear value to Goldberg’s current curvilinear exterior shell).

But – and just throwing in my opinion here – a potentially more successful, and maybe a more easy model to sell, would be that of a hybrid project. An even more flexible one that those that have been presented.

I would have proposed a mixed housing + research facility, where Graduate and PhD students would want to move in to exploit this space as a live/work-share/work environment… that, as supposed to watching tv in the center of the structure.

~

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let’s pray…

Posted in opinion, other architects, projects by DS26 on 01.09.2011

Today, Sunday, a day especially made of religious significance (at least in certain religions) is a day most dedicate to calm, prayer, and faith.

Most, additionally, dedicate this day to be with family, whether partaking in religious activities or not.

When I was growing up Sundays were Catholic Church days, and family gathering at or around lunch time to spend the entire day together at my house. We would be anywhere around 10-15 people or more. Every Sunday.

In lieu of this day, and events in the last one, I thought I would dedicate this post to

7 details that have made 7 of the most recognizable works of religious architecture.

In no particular order of preference (because Ando would be back to back on my two top spots.. ehe):

1. Notre Dame du Haut  (“Ronchamp”)

A famed building, and surely his most significant religious work, by Le Corbusier.

A couple of things that make Ronchamp most recognizable: its roof structure (form), and its varying punched windows. The random-nes of their sizes, widths, angles (within), create a magnificent ever-changing display of light in the space.

Both can be seen in this image and, though the stand alone differing greatly from each other, they’ve made the ‘whole’.

~

In keeping with the theme of light…

2. Church of Light

One of Tadao Ando’s most recognized buildings in Japan.

Details that are most significant in this building, as well as all of most of his other work, is not what is there but is what is created in its absence. Ando believes architecture is not about the objects, but about the void or space created. In the Church of light he creates the cross of light by subtracting it from the concrete wall. Additionally, to create a much greater definition, one can see the side wall joints approach the light cross, to give it a perceived extension.

~

In keeping with the theme of light…

3. Jubilee Church

A religious structure by Richard Meier, in which light is one of the most important design drivers.

From an inside perspective one can see one of the many skylights above. The skylights span from one double curved wall slab to the next. Though obviously not structural, it is built in to the whole building becoming a significant detail in the experience of its faithful. Casting shadows, and allowing daylighting, are these skylights’ most significant purpose.

(Please notice there are structural members from wall to wall, but they act independently from the glass)

~

In keeping with structures…

4. Thorncrown Chapel

A structure meant to bring the outside in, by E. Fray Jones.

There is something very beautiful about the repetitive pattern. The space created by a lattice linear repetition.

Don’t think this space was designed, or meant to bring any particular religious preference. It may instead connect anyone who visits to nature, therefore light, and a sense of peace.

~

In keeping with structures…

5. Sagrada Familia

A never-ending project, of magnificent proportions and detail, designed by Antonio Gaudi.

This, architecturally, is the one building everyone should visit at least once in their lifetime. Whether a religious individual or not, the shear scale of this structure is something to be admired. Also, Gaudi though some regard as having been eccentric, had noble reasons for most of his work.

Aesthetically we’ve heard that there is a certain bone-like inspiration to the columns in the space. If Gaudi was alive I would ask to further give me insight to what he was thinking… I see the “bone-like”, but there are these spurs; these flashes of structure.

I admire the dedication Gaudi put into his work when he was alive, his cause the “forgotten creatures”, and the dedication now of Spain and its people to finalize this monumental work of art beyond his death.

~

In keeping with objects… though not monumentality

6. Church of Water

The second piece featured in this article by Ando.

This time he did not play with what isn’t there… unless we look at a surface for the cross to stand on.

The cross is an object he has placed into an almost god-like existence, floating on water. What I appreciate most about this structure (like any other in his work) is the minimalism that allows what is important to be so strongly perceived… in this case the symbolism of this particular detail.

~

In keeping with minimalism… though not recognized

7. Saint Benedikt

Lastly, though not recognized, this religious structure is so minimal but so perfectly thought out and executed, it could be considered a detail in an of itself.

Designed by Kunze Seeholzer in Germany.

Perfectly detailed doors, benches, even the bell location, and cross…. we call this a little & beautifully crafted ‘religious architectural gem’.

~

Let’s pray… for family… friends… this country… this world… and also for more great design…

Tabitha, of DS26, dies in 2088… ‘pouring’ party scheduled.

Posted in #letsblogoff by DS26 on 01.04.2011

Tabitha, of DS26, dies at 107 on this month of March of 2088.

She was found with a smile, but forehead on table with the signature black ‘lePen’ (now only found at their shop) in hand, at their offices in the more recently formed island of “Las Olas”.

Her ashes were cremated, as requested to save square footage, and will be dropped into the foundation mix of the newest High Tech Center, one of a group of education facilities she spent her whole life conceptualizing and developing.

Concrete foundations are no longer common-place, but she insisted an exception be made upon her passing. She also suggested a ‘pouring’ party, now scheduled.

She leaves behind a very young BobbyZ, now 104, their pet JadaZ III, and no children but a legacy of architecture, education, and music.

~

In “Las Olas Times” :

“Newest High Tech Center, developed, designed and built by famed award-winning firm DS26, had its concrete foundation slabs tested. It has been found that a new super bioconcrete material was developed at curing.

No one knows how, yet, and further investigation is necessary.

BobbyZ, the elusive co-founder of DS26, was not found for comment.”

Blogger Twitter LetsBlogOff Post
Denese Bottrell @Denese_Bottrell Thoughtful Content
Bob Borson @bobborson Life of an Architect
Tabitha Ponte @DESIGNSTUDIO26 26 [at] 41
Madame Sunday @ModernSauce Modern Sauce
Becky Shankle @ecomod Eco-Modernism
Jenny Roets @arch_girl JennyRoets
Cindy FrewenWuellner @Urbanverse Urbanverse’s Posterous
Amy Good @Splintergirl Thoughts of a Splintergirl
Saxon Henry @saxonhenry Roaming by Design
Rufus Dogg @dogwalkblog DogWalkBlog
Jerlyn Thomas @jerlyn Design Lady NYC
Paul Anater @paul_anater Kitchen and Residential Design
Sean Lintow, Sr. @SLSconstruction SLS-Construction.com
Jody Brown @INFILLnc Jody Brown’s Blog

GB10… the best of…

Posted in events, opinion, other architects, sustainability by DS26 on 11.18.2010

It all started bright and early when we showed up at McCormick Place in Chicago… we were directed by friendly faces to pick up our name tags (since we had registered online).

This took an entire 3 whole minutes… and truly I thought WOW!… what a change since the last time Greenbuild came by Chicago in 2007 (where they were not short of endless hours-long lines for registration).

Roaming around our 1st stop was the Bookstore… there I found my friend Marcy’s ADA book (I was so excited to see it there… I tweet-ed it). You can find her tweet-ing all about her expertise (and I suggest you listen) @abadi_access.

Next, we stopped by the merchandise shop… not that I would necessarily get anything, but pure curiosity… but there it was:

OMGB! (Oh My Greenbuild)… I LOVED IT!! (too bad I forgot to take a picture)

Eventually we made our way

The first thing we saw was a cool wind generation vertical turbine called Eddie… It was a beauty (though I still did not take a picture… boo me).

Shortly thereafter, a very cool water collection system pillow (air-less closed system) made to sit inside or outside. It was pretty ingenious.

Eventually, as we kept walking, I finally thought about the camera I was carrying (duh!), the pictures I could be taking, and the potential blog post (this one).

I made up my mind… I will blog about the best in the Greenbuild 2010 exhibit hall.

So.. now that I was enlightened, we were at the Haworth booth. They had a really nice set up, and a very friendly rep that did not hesitate to help us (though many people did not due to our very laid back outfits and very young faces)…

We found they were featuring their custom pieces/sufaces… and saw this table

Could not resist the opportunity to make our mark. ”  DS26 was here!  :)  “

The next coolest thing, and this really was cool, was the knauf insulation. Besides the fact that the insulation was innovative, what really impressed me was their business card, check out the back

Plant this card, and you will get a flower bed. Awesome!

This is truly creative. We picked up a couple, and could not help but to repeat  to everyone that is probably one of the best marketing pieces around.

To keep up with the insulation theme… of course the jeans insulation

I thought it was pretty fun that also, as innovative marketing, they had a fantastic ‘jeans’ cookie.

Also, started to see other inspired & designed booths, this one for example (notice the carpet), where the floor plane lifts into their banners.

I believe that, at this time, we met up with @hern_jenn & @matthewcarbonne … said hello for a bit.

Moving along…

We made it to where I am supposed to be. I love concrete… and I saw the tee. I MUST HAVE IT (and so I do)

In the front “Think. Harder. Concrete.”. In the back

It is debatable, the sustainability of concrete. Natural materials & life?… certainly. Very sustainable. Process?… mmmm.

Best tee shirt I got though. Or, is it?

We kept walking.

Then Boom!!… Black & white, but screaming for us to walk up to it… Interface Flooring

Brains are greater than Oil.

A fact. Anyone would agree.

I walked up to them, and told them how much I liked their marketing… they said that they were doing an on-the-spot social media marketing campaign.

I WANT IN!

So I created our own @DESIGNSTUDIO26 equation… take a walk!  (Walking is greater than driving). They tweet-ed.  :)

If you follow their #greenbuild tweets, via @InterfaceFLOR you will find us there.

Other great installations

The fresh greens installation (above) and the cool FSC lounge (below)

By the way… see that bike there? Wood crafted. Yes, and unbelievably beautiful.

And always cool, young & hip… Bluebeam.

It’s PDFin time!  (chuckle)

So, as we’re winding down… after a long day walking (though I’ve shown you a handful, we’ve covered some 600 exhibitors by now)… In the realm of cool materials check this out

Hand chiseling the USGBC logo… on Aircrete… Hebel.

They showed us the material… very neat. Not only you can chisel it, but also hand saw it, cut it, etc.

The most impressive fact, however, is that there is an hour of fire protection per inch of material… in addition to the drastic reduction in weight from your standard concrete. Impressive!

Now we are very tired… there was a severe lack of seating.

Even at spots where there was coffee, or drinks and food, no tables or chairs. Really?… We could not get more chairs and tables in there?… How much is each person paying again?…

Of the things we missed, I can I admit… I COULD NOT FIND BIG ASS FANS. What the heck happened? Were they even there?…

We found comfy leather benches at Kone… and I decided to give the reps a hard time (since we were ignored)… all in good fun.

And, when we thought it could not be more fun, my business card was drawn at the Weitz Construction booth, and I got to play the cash machine… Though I made $7 bucks (enough to get my caffeine fix) I felt like a million bucks. lol.

Afterward I finally found my friend Robyn, on twitter @robbiejep (one of the original WIAfund collaborators, along with Marcy mentioned above) after chasing her for a couple of hours…

She is presenting a class at Greenbuild on Friday morning early. Catch her if you can… she is a great ‘sustainable’ inspiration from Orange County, California.

And my buddy Lira, on twitter @liraluis, this year’s Athena Young Professional Award-ee, and whom I consider a good friend.

It took about 3 shots to get to this one…

All of us mingled for a little, spoke of Gehry in South Florida (of course), and the USGBC lawsuit… and the Living Building Challenge, from the International Living Building Institute.

Before I forget… the ILBI was kind enough to give me some cool materials for my kids at Duke this coming summer (I’m staff for the “Green Architecture” summer course in their Duke TIP program)… I like to introduce the students to it, and now they’ll have a pocket guide to the process. YAY!

But.. the button is mine!   :D

So next time Greenbuild is around, I suggest you visit. It is a wonderful place for free t-shirts, gain some info, learn, and mingle…

let’s talk CONCRETE(ly)..

Posted in a design education_@Duke by DS26 on 05.28.2010


(CEMENT+WATER)+AGGREGATES

. . . + C H E M I C A L   A D M I X T U R E S  +  R E I N F O R C E M E N T . . .


Simply put, the material rules our world. It can be found everywhere from infrastructure (roads, bridges, tunnels, highways, etc) to buildings, sidewalks, furniture, and more.

Understandably, it is so widely used because of “permanence”. It’s ability to exist, its strength, and to resist wear and tear, all for a really long time.

Don’t take me wrong… we love it. Concrete that is. It can be ‘formed’ at will.

[ formed: cast – in – place by means of wood formwork ]

Why are we discussing it if it’s loved, widely used, and “permanent” ?

Good question !

Concrete is really old, and common place. At one point in time, back before we lost its recipe (after the fall of the Roman Empire) it might have been a ‘Sustainable’ material.

Today, the process of making concrete is everything but sustainable.

Also, we’ll look to see if there are alternatives…

IN HISTORY [ Opus Caementicium ]

Caesarea Maritima, city harbor built by Herod the great (25-13 B.C.) now found in ruins in the mediterranean coast of Israel, is the earliest known use of underwater Roman Concrete technology.

Types of Concrete, as well as preparation methods and instructions, can be found in the “Ten Books of Architecture” by Vitruvious, dating back to 25 B.C.


BASIC COMPOSITION (in summary)

CEMENT:

‘Clinker’ is made by combining limestone and clay, and heating in kiln at 1450 d C. (2642 d F.)

Following, the clinker is ground to powder form. Now clinker, in raw material is a combination of elements such as calcium, silicon, aluminum, oxygen, and iron.

[ So far so good… sustainably. Or so it seams. What about the grinding process ? The equipment required ? or the energy used ?… and furthermore, the energy that is used by the kiln ? ]

WATER:

Water will be the agent to take cement into the process of ‘hydration’.

Depending on water to cement ratio, one can control workability versus strength.

AGGREGATES:

Fine or coarse. Usually sand, crushed stones, and other natural material.

Most of the time recycled aggregates (those from previously demolished material) can be used in mix design, helping preserve those ‘sustainable’ construction methods.

So… they are all natural materials ?… Doesn’t that make it ‘Sustainable’ ?

The answer to that, sadly, is no.

Even though all materials are natural, the processes we use to crush and grind the materials, the energies used in the ‘kilns’, and even all of the oil used for transport, and emissions, actually create one very un-sustainable cycle.


ADDITIONAL ADD-ON(s)

ADMIXTURES:

Additional substances that, combined with the Basic Composition of concrete, will give the material additional desired qualities or specific characteristics.

EXAMPLES of Admixtures:

1. Superplasticizer: increases strength by reducing needed water in mix.

2. Accelerator: reduces time needed for curing.

3. Retarding: increases time needed for curing.

4. Pigment: adds color to concrete.

[ curing: the process of the concrete drying, while gaining strength… must be according to engineered mix design, strength desired, etc. ]

Unlike the basic composition of concrete, now we have seen that artificial additions are made for either looks or characteristics.

This ‘artificiality’ only exacerbates our ‘sustainability’ (lack thereof) problem.

REINFORCEMENT:

Reinforcement is steel, in the form of bars or ties.

Concrete is reinforced because without it the material is weak in ‘tension’. Concrete without reinforcement is good only in ‘compression’.

Reinforcing Steel (or commonly ‘rebar’) is made of carbon steel, carbon as an alloying natural base, but then manufactured into ribbed barks.

And, you guessed it ! … creating ribs cannot be too sustainable.

For a Bigger Picture of the material, and processes related, do refer to bottom of post for the History Channel’s “Modern Marvels – Concrete”

SO… WHAT CAN WE DO ? … AND, WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE TO MAKE IT MORE ‘SUSTAINABLE’ ?

Listen in to a leader in the forefront of bio-material development. The video will speak for itself…

But, isn’t Rachel Armstrong just speaking of an idea ? a concept ? … she is not showing us anything.

well, that is true, but hold on.. there are other people that are diving into this with some physical evidence.

SO… THERE ARE NEW SCIENCES ?

Correct !

for example, Ginger Krieg Dosier, an assistant architecture professor, received the 2010 Next Generation Design Competition award for the development of a bio-brick.

– Dosier’s act of alchemy was to apply science to design. “There are thousands of examples of microbial mineral precipitation in the scientific literature, but few if any of them have been explored for use in fabrication of construction or design materials”

( excerpt from Metropolis Magazine )

For more on her design / development, you can visit the article for [ Next Generation Design ]

~

Also, let’s listen to someone that’s thought up a natural remedy for concrete…

Bio-Concrete. He poses the possibility of “maintenance and repair in the future”… but

what if we could implement the same natural processes for simply its creation ?

BIOMIMICRY (or Biomimetics):

A new emerging science where natural processes, systems, and materials, are being emulated for the creation of problem solutions.

The one at hand : Architecture and Construction.

If you are interested in learning more about Biomimicry, visit the [ Biomimicry Institute ]

~

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MODERN MARVELS – CONCRETE part 1

MODERN MARVELS – CONCRETE part 2

MODERN MARVELS – CONCRETE part 3

MODERN MARVELS – CONCRETE part 4

MODERN MARVELS – CONCRETE part 5